Making the silicon mould

Yesterday we edited our last test piece from the cast-able resin. We printed a version which was not digitally restored and then tried to restore it manually with wax to see if this method works better than restoring it digitally. The restoring was done with a soldering iron to melt the wax and then dab it onto the surface. We also tried to scrape away material at the edges with some sculpting tools to make the ornaments on the crown more detailed. The cast-able resin has a soft wax layer at the surface, but is a lot harder beneath the surface layer. It turned out to be harder than we expected to edit the piece.

Restoring the cast-able resin piece with wax and a soldering iron

Dripping the wax onto the model

So now we have four different types of test pieces which will be casted.

Four types of test pieces

After the restoration we started with the production of the wax moulds. To make a piece of the crown from wax, we need a silicone mould where we can pour the wax into. We plan to make the silicone mould by pouring liquid silicone together with harderer in a wooden box. In the box we will stick our four crown pieces with some double sided tape on the bottom of the box. Then we will pour the silicon in and let it harden for twentyfour hours. Then we can break the walls of the box away and we have our silicon mould!

For the box we used a piece of mdf board. To assure that the silicone would not stick too much to the box we used clear tape to cover the inside of the wooden box. We also used sculpting clay to cover all the edged of the box so that there are no sharp corners in the silicon mould.

We found out that the cast-able resin pieces did not stick too well to the double sided tape, probably because of the thin wax layer, so we decided to stick them to the bottom of the box with the sculpting clay. We are not so sure if the pieces are well enough attached to the bottom. If that is the case, then the silicone can slip between the edges and fill up the cavity beneath the test pieces. Hopefully this will not be the case.

Making the wooden box for the silicone mould

 

The finished silicon mould

We mixed the silicon with the harderer and poured in into the wooden mould.

Pouring the silicon in the mould

Then we put the mould in the vacuum oven. Just to be sure we put the temperature a low as possible. The silicon rose a lot in the mould so it would have been better if we made the sides of the box a bit higher. To prevent the silicn from pooling over we let a little air in the oven bit by bit. This worked fine.

Removing air bubbles with the vacuum oven

There were quite a lot of large air bubbles so maybe some of the silicon slipped beneath the edged of the test pieces.

Inside the vacuum oven

This is the end result. It seems that most of the bubbles in the mould are gone so we are positive that the wax moulds will turn out fine. We let the silicon set over the weekend and on Monday we will start with the wax pouring.

 

 

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